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Process.WaitForExit Method ()

When you do poll instead of using event when they are available then you are using CPU for no reason and that indicate that you are a bad programmer. You need UseShellExecute to be set to false if you want to redirect the output. It would however happen under Windows 8, but not under Windows 7. The system is aware of handles to exited processes that have not been released by Process components, so it keeps the ExitTime and Handle information in memory until the Process component specifically frees the resources. If you pass 0 zero to the method, it returns true only if the process has already exited; otherwise, it immediately returns false. StandardOut has not been redirected or the process hasn't started yet. Doing so, make a race condition because the output stream can receive data before you set it to asynchronous:.

WaitForExit() makes the current thread wait until the associated process terminates. It should be called after all other methods are called on the process. It should be .

Introduction

Remove From My Forums. Sign in to vote. I want to open "Notes" application in my app and wait for it to close, so that I can use some data created by Notes application like new notes etc.. I use the following code:. Friday, February 20, 8: My guess is that Notes. So the WaitForExit returns when that happens. Let's read what MSDN says about it: Friday, February 20, I'd like to bump this question up.

I'm on Windows Mobile 6 Standard and I'm trying to spawn a browser instance. I'd like to wait until the user closes the browser.

Instructs the Process component to wait indefinitely for the associated process to exit. Instructs the Process component to wait the specified number of milliseconds for the associated process to exit. No process Id has been set, and a Handle from which the Id property can be determined does not exist. There is no process associated with this Process object.

You are attempting to call WaitForExit for a process that is running on a remote computer. This method is available only for processes that are running on the local computer. See the Remarks section of the StandardError property reference page. WaitForExit makes the current thread wait until the associated process terminates. It should be called after all other methods are called on the process.

This method instructs the Process component to wait an infinite amount of time for the process and event handlers to exit. This can cause an application to stop responding. For example, if you call CloseMainWindow for a process that has a user interface, the request to the operating system to terminate the associated process might not be handled if the process is written to never enter its message loop. Also, previous versions did not wait for the event handlers to exit if the full MaxValue time was reached.

This overload ensures that all processing has been completed, including the handling of asynchronous events for redirected standard output. You should use this overload after a call to the WaitForExit Int32 overload when standard output has been redirected to asynchronous event handlers. When an associated process exits that is, when it is shut down by the operation system through a normal or abnormal termination , the system stores administrative information about the process and returns to the component that had called WaitForExit.

The Process component can then access the information, which includes the ExitTime , by using the Handle to the exited process. For this reason, any time you call Start for a Process instance, call Close when the associated process has terminated and you no longer need any administrative information about it. Close frees the memory allocated to the exited process. Process Class Process Members System. NET Framework version 1.

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Definition

The WaitForExit () overload is used to make the current thread wait until the associated process terminates. This method instructs the Process component to wait an infinite amount of time for the process to exit. This can cause an application to stop responding. from msdn: The code example avoids a deadlock condition by calling kalmarsunqdhotel.tkEnd before kalmarsunqdhotel.tkrExit. A deadlock condition can result if the parent process calls kalmarsunqdhotel.tkrExit before kalmarsunqdhotel.tkEnd and the child process writes enough text to fill the redirected stream. @LonelyPixel IMO, WaitForExit() will block a thread during the time the process is running. Depending on TaskScheduler, usually not the calling one, but one thread from ThreadPool. The solution from the answer may not block a ThreadPool thread.